CURRENT STATUS OF VULTURE POPULATION AT JORBEER, BIKANER

Main Article Content

BALRAM SAIN
DIGVIJAY SINGH SHEKHAWAT
SHARMILA CHHALLANI

Abstract

Vultures are important for their ecological, social and cultural significance. They scavenge on animal carcasses and keep the environment clean. Vultures have appeared to be one of the fastest declining bird species in the world since early nineties. Nine species of vultures have been recorded in the India; seven species out of them have been observed in the study area including resident and migratory species. Population estimation and monitoring is essential for conservation of any species. Since the population of vulture is declining. Population size along with life history parameters indicates whether the species is declining, stable or increasing.

Hence, the status of vulture population at Jorbeer has been carried out in the present investigation. This study will establish the investigated area as a paradise for vultures that havens various vulture species of conservational importance.

Keywords:
Caracass, Jorbeer, population, scavenger, species, vultures

Article Details

How to Cite
SAIN, B., SHEKHAWAT, D. S., & CHHALLANI, S. (2019). CURRENT STATUS OF VULTURE POPULATION AT JORBEER, BIKANER. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 40(2), 60-66. Retrieved from https://www.mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1427
Section
Original Research Article

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