CHECKLIST OF SPIDERS FROM THE SACRED GROVES OF NORTHERN KERALA, INDIA

Main Article Content

NJAREKKATTIL VASU SUMESH
AMBALAPARAMBIL VASU SUDHIKUMAR

Abstract

Sacred groves are important gene pools and the first major effort of the society to recognize and conserve biodiversity. In addition to preserving the biodiversity, they help in soil and water conservation. At present, the area covered by sacred groves in India is gradually declining owing to various socioeconomic factors. Like other groves of Kerala, Sacred groves of North Malabar region are also facing the threat of extinction from increasing anthropogenic activities. Sacred groves of Northern Kerala have rich and diverse flora that supports an important array of fauna. This study presents a checklist of the spider fauna in 15 the sacred groves. It is a pioneering study and no other studies done in this area. The sampling methods such as line transect method; handpicking in ground and strata, and beating were used to catch specimens. The caught specimens were preserved and identified to species and genus level using available literature. A total of 257 species of spiders belonging to 130 genera and 28 families were identified from the study area. The dominant family was Araneidae followed by Salticidae, Theridiidae, and Thomisidae, these families represent roughly the 47% of the total abundance. Five families were observed as rare in the study area with less than 2 individuals.

Keywords:
Araneofauna, India, richness, sacred natural sites

Article Details

How to Cite
SUMESH, N. V., & SUDHIKUMAR, A. V. (2020). CHECKLIST OF SPIDERS FROM THE SACRED GROVES OF NORTHERN KERALA, INDIA. UTTAR PRADESH JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 41(9), 104-115. Retrieved from https://www.mbimph.com/index.php/UPJOZ/article/view/1590
Section
Original Research Article

References

Kashmeera NA, Sudhikumar AV. A checklist of spider fauna of Rajasthan, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 2019;11(1):13184-7.

World Spider Catalog. World Spider Catalog. Version 21.0. Natural History Museum Bern; 2020.

Available:http://wsc.nmbe.ch

(Accessed on 04/08/2020)

DOI: 10.24436/2

Caleb JTD, Sankaran PM. Araneae of India. Version 2020.

Available:http://www.indianspiders.in

(Accessed on 04/06/2020)

Adarsh CK, Nameer PO. A preliminary checklist of spiders (Araneae: Arachnida) in Chinnar Wildlife Sanctuary, Western Ghats, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 2016;8(4): 8703-13.

Malhotra KC, Gokhale Y, Chatterjee S, Srivastava S. Cultural and ecological dimensions of sacred groves in India. INSA, New Delhi; 2001.

Menon SV. Sacred groves. The natural resources of Kerala. World Wide Fund for Nature-India, Thiruvananthapuram. 1997;567: 159-67.

Induchoodan NC. Ecological studies on the sacred groves of Kerala (Ph.D. Thesis); 1997.

Jyothi KM, Nameer PO. Birds of sacred groves of Northern Kerala, India. Journal of Threatened Taxa. 2015;7(15):8226-36.

Kapoor V. An assessment of spider sampling methods in tropical rainforest fragments of the Anamalai Hills, Western Ghats, India. Zoo’s Print. 2006;21:2483-8.

Chandran MS, Gadgil M, Hughes JD. Sacred groves of the Western Ghats of India. Conserving the Sacred for Biodiversity Management. 1998;211-31.

Pinzón J, Spence JR. Bark-dwelling spider assemblages (Araneae) in the boreal forest: Dominance, diversity, composition and life- histories. Journal of Insect Conservation. 2010; 14(5):439-458.

Jayarajan M. Sacred groves of North Malabar. Kerala Research Programme on Local Level Development. Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram; 2004.

Sivaperuman C. Conservation of the spiders in sacred groves of Kerala. Eco News. 2008; 13(4):9–12.

Patil VK. Wildlife reserves v/s sacred groves: Conservation assessment from people‘s perspective. College of Forestry, DBSKKV, Dapoli, India. 2011;70.

Patil VK. Diversity of spider assemblages in sacred groves of Ratnagiri. Maharashtra: Implications for Conservation Management in the Landscape (Ph.D. Thesis); 2016.

Roy S, Roy K, Mitra B. Arthropod faunal diversity in some sacred trees of Serampore, Hoogly, West Bengal. Records of the Zoological Survey of India. 2012;112(2):65-75.

De K, Palita SK. A checklist of spiders from six sacred groves in Southern Odisha, India. Serket. 2018;16(1):30-40.

Anupama C. Ecological studies on selected sacred groves of Malabar (Ph.D. Thesis); 2013.

Lubin YD. Seasonal abundance and diversity of web-building spiders in relation to habitat structure on Barro Colorado Island, Panama. Journal of Arachnology. 1978;31-51.

Sebastian PA, Peter KV. Spiders of India. Orient Blackswan, Hyderabad. 2009;754.

Tikader BK. Handbook of Indian Spiders, Zoological Survey of India, Calcutta, India.

Barrion AT, Litsinger JA. Riceland spiders of South and Southeast Asia. Int. Rice Res. Inst.; 1995.

Jocqué R, Dippenaar-Schoeman AS, Zoologin S. Spider families of the world; 2006.

Nentwig W, Blick T, Bosmans R, Hanggi A, Kropf C. Spiders of Europe. Version {02}; 2020.

Available:https://araneae.nmbe.ch

(Accessed on 04 2020)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.24436/1

Wise DH. Spiders in ecological webs Cambridge University Press. New York ISBN-13. 1993;978-0521.

Rypstra AL, Carter PE, Balfour RA, Marshall SD. Architectural features of agricultural habitats and their impact on the spider inhabitants. Journal of Arachnology. 1999;1: 371-7.